7.11.2015

My headboard tutorial


I want to share how we built our headboard.

West Elm Stria Headboard Hack

I tried downloading Sketch up but apparently you need to learn how to use it before you start doodling on it like I did, bad idea, I'm going to need to take a course some day.  So here is the unfancyest tutorial ever.

Shopping List
2- 2" x 3" @ 8'
4- 2" x 4" @ 8'
7- 1" x 3" @ 8'
2- 2" x 2" @ 8'
3- 1" x 2" @ 8'
2 1/2" screws (we countersunk the screws otherwise you could just use a Kreg jig and buy pocket whole screws).
1" screws (for middle support on back of the headboard)

Cutting List
2- 2" x 3" @ 59"  Top and Bottom of the Frame for the slats
2- 2" x 3" @ 36-3/4"  sides of the frame *(left over from the two first cuts)
1- 1" x 3" @ 33-3/4"  middle support *(use leftover 1" x  3" from front slats)
3- 1" x 2" @ 62" Front slats
2- 2" x 2" @ 62" Front slats
7- 1" x 3" @ 62" Front slats
4- 2" x 4" @ 62" Front slats
2- 2" x 4" @ 23" Legs

Order of slats
1x2 (this is the only slat that will be screwed in from the back and into the 1" side).
1x3
2x4
1x3
2x2
1x3
1x2
2x4
1x3
2x2
1x2
1x3
2x4
1x3
2x4
1x3

You should have a total of 16 slats all together

This is what we did.  I sanded every single board prior to putting it together to make it easier because you will have lots of height variation.  I used 60 grit, followed by 220 grit to give it a very smooth finish.

First step is to build your frame with the 2" x 3" studs.  Predrill your wholes for the screws and countersink them from the out side and use wood filler.


Next we started screwing in the slats from top to bottom.  The first slat (1" x 2") is flushed even with the frame.  We attached all the slats by screwing them in from the back of the frame countersinking in the screws as we went along so that we didn't leave any scratches on the walls.  I would advise you  to put your middle support on first I don't know why we skipped this step and did it later.




We also ended up turning the headboard upside down because the first slat gave it a sturdy base to work on.

 This is what I mean by we screwed the slats in from the back of the frame countersinking the wholes as we went along. 

West Elm Stria Headboard Hack

And that's it, because we attached the legs after we stained the headboard.  I forgot to throw pics of that part. Sorry, I'm new at this. As for the stain we used one coat of natural oxidizing stain.  The stain gives it a weathered look.  But because my stain was mixed weeks prior to making the headboard it had already created rust from the steel wool which resulted in some reddish tones around the headboard which I personally didn't like.  I wiped the headboard down with a couple of damp cloths to remove most of the rust but I still don't like the color.

West Elm Stria Headboard Hack

You can see some of the color variations here.

West Elm Stria Headboard Hack

You can see more pictures of our headboard in this post.

Cost of making this headboard
$32.83  Lumber
$8.47 pack of 2-1/2" screws
Grand total of $41.30 plus tax @ $2.48 equals a whopping  $43.78
Everything else we already owned.  Our inspiration bed cost $899 plus tax, delivery, shipping and handling puts it over $1,000 ouch.

This is what I would do differently if I were to make this headboard again.  First I would add to the frame the length of the legs at the very beginning.  I would also replace the top 2x3 frame piece and the first 1x2 slat with a simple 1x4 to keep the look more clean even though you really can't see it from where your standing.  I would not make my stain weeks before to prevent all the reddish tones on my headboard from the rust of the steel wool.

Over all the bed was easy to make, super inexpensive, and imperfections and all we love it.  There you have it my not so fancy tutorial.  I hope you can understand it well enough to be able to make your own headboard.

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